Monday, March 8, 2010

Sin, Rescue, Perfection?

This question came from someone who wrote to me from my website:
If the bible says not to judge, doesn't that mean that everything happens for a reason, so we're not supposed to get upset when we get less than pleasing results in life?? A book I read the other day—A New Earth—says there is no such thing is good and bad; it just "is" and we should not judge as good and bad because its all from God. What confuses me is that if we're all made from God wouldn't that mean we're already perfect so why do "sinners" get told we're not and that we have to ask to be saved. I'm a Christian, but I don't get it!!

I think the idea is that there are natural laws, as in nature, as in consciousness—universal principles. When we act in harmony with them, everything evolves and there is no suffering. Part of this Flow is a natural expansion and contraction, like breathing. Contraction is not evil, just part of life, but I think religions have often misinterpreted this. When actions are motivated by fear and control, they are out of harmony, meaning they don't allow us to experience the true qualities of spirit. That is why spiritual leaders point out certain behaviors as undesirable—like murder and the various "sins." Sin means missing the mark. It means these ways of acting are inefficient and block us from experiencing ourselves as having the divine inside us, and all around us. I think we are created perfectly, and are always actually complete, but because of the way our minds work, the way the mind perceives separation—we focus on fear and negativity and don't actually experience this oneness with the divine fully. Most spiritual paths teach ways to come back into harmony with the experience of oneness. And as for asking to be saved, perhaps this is just the act of opening our minds for the grace of natural perfection to reemerge once again, to make a hole through which truth can flow without being suppressed by fear's drama.


1 comment:

KellieS said...

That is one of the best ways I've ever heard that question answered. I love that you have really shown how "religions have misinterpreted" what evil is and how it works in us. Kudos to you for taking the higher road on this controversial issue. I will be back for more of your insights.